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Tomb of Napoleon France Today's Paris is unthinkable without the high dome of the Cathedral of the Invalides, rising 101 meters high and dazzlingly sparkling with numerous gold ornaments

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The tomb of Napoleon Bonaparte is located under the gilded dome of the Cathedral of St. Louis of the Invalides.

As you know, Napoleon died on the island of St. Helena on May 5, 1821. In 1840, King Louis-Philippe received the consent of Great Britain to return the ashes of the exile to France. On December 14 of that year, the military frigate La Belle-Pul delivered the coffin to France. The next day, the body of the emperor, with a huge gathering of people, was solemnly moved to the House of Disabled Persons, the national necropolis of military leaders.

The tomb of Napoleon was temporarily, until the completion of the permanent tomb, installed in the chapel of St. Jerome. The creation of the permanent tomb was delayed for 20 years - the author of the project, the architect Louis Visconti, did not live to see its completion. But the construction turned out to be extremely magnificent.

A huge sarcophagus measuring 4 by 2 by 4.5 meters and weighing 35 tons was carved from a diamond-resistant Karelian porphyry - Tsar Nicholas I presented a two-hundred-ton block of this mineral to the French government specifically for the monument. They say that he joked that in Russia there will always be a stone for Napoleon.

Inside the sarcophagus there are five coffins alternately inserted into each other, storing the body of the emperor: tin, mahogany, two zinc and ebony. A tomb was installed on a pedestal of greenish granite. Around are twelve winged Victories, carved by Jean-Jacques Pradier from specially selected blocks of Carrara marble. On the stone floor are visible the names of the cities near which Napoleon won, including Moscow.

On April 2, 1861, Napoleon’s body was forever walled up in a sarcophagus - in the uniform of the commander of the guards, at the feet of the famous cocked hat. The entrance to the tomb is guarded by two colossal bronze guards holding the imperial crown, scepter and power.

In the House of Disabled Persons there is also an anonymous gravestone, under which the emperor was lying on the island of St. Helena. The stone can be seen from the gallery, which leads to the Court of Honor, surrounded on four sides by the buildings of the House of Disabled.

Cathedral of the House of the Disabled and the tomb of Napoleon

Unlike its northern neighbor, the Soldier's Church, this Cathedral with Corinthian columns, pilasters and pompous frescoes is a magnificent example of architectural sophistication.

Here, in a glass crypt directly under the dome of the Cathedral, is the tomb of Napoleon. The ashes of Napoleon I (Bonaparte) rest in a sarcophagus of crimson granite, surrounded by statues of guards, symbolizing his military victories.

Above the crypt is surrounded by a round gallery decorated with friezes depicting the emperor’s civil achievements, under which are quoted statements by Napoleon Bonaparte himself, reflecting his exorbitant vanity (however, often justified), for example: “By its simplicity, my code brought more good to France than all previous laws” or "Whatever direction the shadow of my reign fell, everywhere it left traces of its significance."

The shadow of Napoleon reappeared in Paris on December 14, 1840, on the day when the hearse, who delivered his ashes from Saint Helena to Paris, drove through the city streets to the Cathedral of the Invalides through the newly completed Arc de Triomphe.

While the ruler of France was the representative of the Bourbon dynasty, Louis Philippe and Napoleon’s nephew Louis Napoleon was in prison for an attempted coup attempt four months earlier, up to half a million Bonapartists freely took to the streets to see their emperor in last way.

Victor Hugo spoke about this day: “it seemed as if all of Paris had moved to one part of the city, like water in a vase that was tilted.” Perhaps even more impressive than the tomb of Napoleon is the rather simple design of the tomb of Marshal Foch, commander-in-chief of the Allied forces in World War I, which is located in the side chapel near the stairs leading to the crypt.

Through the stained glass windows, a bluish light penetrates the chapel’s interior, illuminating a bronze monument: it depicts sorrowful infantrymen who see off their marshal’s body on their last journey.

A brief history of burial

On May 5, 1821, Napoleon died on St. Helena, where he was in exile since 1815. He was buried near a spring, in the shadow of weeping willows, in an area called the “Valley of Geraniums”. His remains remained there until 1840, when King Louis-Philippe decided to transfer the emperor's ashes. On board the Belle Poule.

French sailors, under the command of Prince de Joinville, transported the coffin with the remains of Napoleon to France. A state funeral ceremony was held in honor of the return of the ashes of the Emperor Napoleon, who was placed in the House of the Disabled on December 15, 1840, pending the construction of the tomb. In 1842, King Louis Philippe entrusted the construction of the tomb to the architect Visconti (1791-1853), who carried out significant transformations in the Dome Cathedral, breaking a huge hole to accommodate the tomb. The ashes of Napoleon were finally buried there on April 2, 1861.

Description of the tomb of Napoleon

The tomb of Napoleon Bonaparte is located under the gilded dome of the Cathedral of St. Louis of the Invalides.

A huge sarcophagus measuring 4 by 2 by 4.5 meters and weighing 35 tons is carved from a diamond-resistant Karelian porphyry - Tsar Nicholas I presented the French government specifically for the monument with a two hundred ton block of this mineral. They say that he joked that in Russia there will always be a stone for Napoleon.

Inside the sarcophagus there are five coffins alternately inserted into each other, storing the body of the emperor: tin, mahogany, two zinc and ebony. A tomb was installed on a pedestal of greenish granite. Around are twelve winged Victories, carved by Jean-Jacques Pradier from specially selected blocks of Carrara marble. On the stone floor are visible the names of the cities near which Napoleon won, including Moscow.

On April 2, 1861, Napoleon’s body was forever walled up in a sarcophagus - in the uniform of the commander of the guards, at the feet of the famous cocked hat. The entrance to the tomb is guarded by two colossal bronze guards holding the imperial crown, scepter and power.

In the House of Disabled Persons there is also an anonymous gravestone, under which the emperor was lying on the island of St. Helena. The stone can be seen from the gallery, which leads to the Court of Honor, surrounded on four sides by the buildings of the House of Disabled.

The Disabled House houses several important museums. The Museum of Plans and Reliefs contains an extensive collection of layouts of cities and fortresses on a large scale and in detail. The Museum of the Army, as the name implies, is dedicated to the military affairs of France, from ancient times to the exhibits of two world warriors. The museum houses one of the richest collections of weapons and armor in the world. The Museum of the Order of Liberation is dedicated to the activities of the French resistance during the Second World War. The Museum of Modern Art has an extensive collection of paintings, photographs, postcards and posters.

Army Museum

The very first museum here was founded on the initiative of Louis XIV for veterans. True, initially these were 2 separate rooms, illuminating the history of the development of artillery and troops, and only in 1905 did they merge into the Army Museum.

In the department of ancient weapons, the emphasis is on weapons and armor of several eras, from the Paleolithic to the end of the XVII century, covering representatives of different countries. Collections are constantly replenished thanks to private gifts and exhibits from other repositories and organizations: the Louvre, the Mint, Pierrefonds Castle and the Vienna Museum of Artillery.

The visitors are presented in all their glory the equipment of the Near and Far East, and the time frame covers the periods of the Persian, Ottoman, Mongolian and other empires. In the exposition of the uniforms, the solemn royal armor and the battle scenes depicted in the wall painting, in particular the Franco-Dutch war under the sun king, are of interest.

The heading of the new era covers the years 1648-1792, where radical changes in the constitution of the French troops are traced. Reforms affect the hierarchy of ranks, a uniform military uniform is legalized. Under Louis XV, soldiers are equipped with the first model gun, with which they will go to battle for the Austrian inheritance.

Further, the museum talks about the reforms during the reign of Louis XVI, in which the country was involved in the American War of Independence, and smoothly leads visitors to the section of the New Time, which covers the history of France until 1871.

These include key events from the revolution to the creation of the Paris Commune. The department of the last world wars covers the years 1871-1945, where the weapons and uniforms of the troops of all the warring countries are on the agenda.

Going to the artillery section, you will see a unique collection. Here along with recreated models there are a lot of real guns, and among them one of the very first guns of the XIV century.

Museum of Plans and Reliefs

The official date of the foundation of the museum is 1943, but the thread of history takes us to the distant 1668th. It was at this time that Minister of War Francois-Michel de Letelier founded his collection of voluminous mock-ups of cities protected by fortifications. He was interested in both the fortifications themselves and the terrain with its features, since from a tactical point of view these data are very important.

The development of maps was carried out by engineer Vauban, whose heart is buried in the necropolis of the House of Disabled. For a couple of years, he had accumulated a rather interesting collection of layouts, and Louis XIV decided that they were equated with secret documents, and therefore they should be kept under reliable guard at the Louvre.

However, after the death of the sun king, no one else is interested in mock-ups, and they were remembered only before the seven-year war, then Louis XV orders them to be updated. The main part of the panopticon was published in 1741-1748 - they captured the occupied territories of the period when France became a participant in the conflict over the Austrian inheritance.

The next update of maps and models took place in 1754, after 23 years they moved to the House of Disabled, and became a part of the exhibition in 1943, when the Museum of Plans and Reliefs was organized.

Museum of the Order of Liberation

This museum was created in honor of the Order of Liberation, or rather its gentlemen. On an area of ​​1 thousand square meters. m housed 3 galleries and 6 large rooms, containing more than 4,000 exhibits: weapons, military uniforms, the banners of the countries of Europe and Egypt taken in battle, important documents, leaflets and other underground press. Museum of the Order of Liberation

For the entire period of existence of the Order of Liberation, and established by Charles de Gaulle in November 1940, only 1,061 people were awarded. Of these, only 6 are women, 44 are foreigners (Winston Churchill among them), and the youngest cavaliers are Matiuren Enrio, 14 years old and Lazar Pitkovich, 16 years old.

The award was awarded to members of the Resistance Group during the Second World War. Since 1945, it had similar advantages as the Legion of Honor, and in 1967 the Invalides Palace became the place where the museum was opened in honor of the Knights of the Order, where you can see a list of all awarded heroes.

Museum of Modern History

It’s interesting to visit the Museum of Modern History because it is the only one where you can see how France has changed over the course of the 20th century. Formally, he appeared in 1987, although the Disabled House opened the door for him back in 1973.

If you study his past, you will have to go to the beginning of the century, when a certain businessman LeBran opens a museum library in 1914, and after 3 years gives his brainchild to the Ministry of Education. Next is the year 1925, and President Dumerg establishes the War Museum at Vienna Castle.

At first, it was called the Museum of Modern History behind the scenes, but, as you know, the name stuck, and when he moved to the Invalid Museum in the 70s, he was documented.

Here a collection of 500 objects is exhibited, including paintings by artists, photographic images, posters, postcards and prints.

Tourists reviews

Tamerlan77

The tomb is located in the Cathedral at the House of Disabled, there is also the Museum of the Army. A very beautiful place in which the greatness of France and its relation to its history are felt. Napoleon is buried in a sarcophagus of red granite, sent by the Russian emperor. In addition to him, several marshals of France are buried there. There you can buy souvenir coins at the unit for 2 euros, with the emblem of the tomb of Napolenon.

ErikLaVanda

The Disabled House itself is already a great place to visit. So much grandeur in this building! And the Army Museum is located at a very good address! Of course, the Cathedral of the Invalides with the tomb of Napoleon is a must-see place in Paris (do not forget about the medals at the entrance to the cathedral as a keepsake). But the museum of the army in it is also not worth missing.!

Sava19633

Hermitage resting A bunch of weapons Stuffed horse of Napoleon and the French kings. You’re going to stop walking. An audio guide is needed. There is an excursion. Gadfly Suddenly found out that Napoleon attacked, because we wanted to take Poland

One room was dedicated in 1812, and a whole corridor was dedicated to the 2-week war. But they said at the end that the entire army was destroyed by 700 thousand. About the fact that we took Paris, too, forgot to mention. The Frenchmen do not like us. Well, the pantheon of generals including Napoleon is also impressive.

AlexAlex55

After visiting the House of Disabled people, you must definitely go to the tomb of Napoleon. The story itself is looking at you. An unusual sarcophagus, the ashes of Napoleon’s soldiers in the walls ...

Valeriy r

The museum is located in a house of invalids built specifically for former warriors in gratitude for their contribution to the affairs of his native France. Perhaps it will be a mistake for everyone if you do not visit this museum. There is something to see here. As a Russian, I feel a little uneasy that for our losses in the Second World War there is practically nothing — so casual, even Hitler has more attention. But as they say - this is the right of the French. The citizens of this country respect the history, even if not always successful and positive. In a word, you run into this museum for an hour, and it takes a whole day ... I highly recommend it.

Tomb of Napoleon

The Invalides House in Paris serves as a tomb for many famous Frenchmen, mainly famous in the war field. The greatest of them, without a doubt, is Napoleon Bonaparte, the commander and politician who changed the face of the world. He was solemnly reburied here in 1840, when the British finally allowed his remains to be removed from St. Helena. Since then, the tomb of Napoleon I remains in the House of Disabled and everyone can visit it.

Napoleon’s grave is a real work of art from Karelian porphyry. The embarrassment of the situation is that the architect chose the Karelian stone for the construction of the tombstone. France needed to buy material in Russia. And in 1846, Nicholas I said that for Napoleon Russia will always find a piece of stone, sending a block weighing 200 tons to Paris free of charge.

The Disabled House houses several important museums. The Museum of Plans and Reliefs contains an extensive collection of layouts of cities and fortresses on a large scale and in detail. The Museum of the Army, as the name implies, is dedicated to the military affairs of France, from ancient times to the exhibits of two world warriors. The museum houses one of the richest collections of weapons and armor in the world. The Museum of the Order of Liberation is dedicated to the activities of the French resistance during the Second World War.The Museum of Modern Art has an extensive collection of paintings, photographs, postcards and posters.

  • The uprising Parisians captured the guns for the capture of the Bastille in the basements of the Invalides, where the artillery warehouse was located.
  • The dome of the Disabled House church served as inspiration for the construction of the Capitol, the seat of the US Congress.
  • It is noteworthy that the complex still retains its original function - currently about a hundred veterans of the French army live in it.

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